Arisa Advocating Rights in South Asia
RFP: Study on Mapping (international) Supply Chains linked to Child Labourers and Homeworkers in the Garment Industry in Delhi
-1
Delhi
Application Email : st@arisa.nl

Website

www.arisa.nl

Job Type

Full Time

Closing Date

Dec 01 2021

Description

Terms of Reference - Work: No Child’s Business (WNCB) programme

 

Study on mapping (international) supply chains linked to child labourers and homeworkers in the garment industry in Delhi

 

1. Background

 

The garment industry in India widely employs children. Delhi/the National Capital Region (NCR), covering Delhi and surrounding geographical areas, is considered as one of the five garment production hubs in India, along with Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai and Tirupur/Coimbatore. Delhi/NCR is one of the ‘industrial clusters’ of the garment industry, referring to the export concentration in the capital city (The Hidden Workforce, Save the Children, 2015).

 

Thousands of children are engaged in the home-based garment industry in the national capital.[1] A clear link with homeworking comes forward as well, as a study of Save the Children displayed that the majority of children that were found working for the garment industry (87%) were doing so in their homes, alongside their homeworking family members – mostly mothers.[2] Homeworking is an integrated part of the garment industry in Delhi/NCR, with homeworkers taking care of specific steps in garment production, and handling outsourced work from garment factories.[3]

 

In Delhi, the garment industry is predominantly export driven, catering primarily to the international market in addition to some local markets within the country. According to a shipment data analysis based on shipment data of the trade data platform Panjiva,[4] around 60% of exports from Delhi (including Okhla), Noida and Gurgaon in 2019 ends up in Europe. The main European receiving countries in 2019 of garment shipments from Delhi and from these three areas combined are the UK (by far), Germany, France, Spain, and The Netherlands.

 

The study outlined in this Terms of Reference (ToR), is developed as part of the Work: No Child’s Business (WNCB) programme,[5] which aims to contribute to eliminating child labour[6] and making sure that every child enjoys the right to quality education and future decent work. India is one of the six countries in which this programme is being implemented, with Delhi/NCR being one of the three regions in India that take part in the programme. Save the Children India, ICCSPL and Arisa are engaged in activities for the Delhi/NCR region and have jointly taken up the opportunity to do research on the nature of child labour in the garment industry in the WNCB intervention areas in Delhi and to determine the link with international supply chains. The research is divided in two different sub-studies. One sub-study looks at the nature of child labour in the WNCB intervention areas in the garment industry in Delhi. The study outlined in this ToR will cover the second sub-study, being a mapping exercise to link child labourers and homeworkers in Delhi/NCR to export garment factories, and to gain a better understanding on how the supply chain between export garment factories and homeworkers and child labourers in Delhi/NCR is structured.

 

Arisa (Advocating Rights in South Asia) will take the lead for this particular sub-study. Arisa is an independent non-governmental human rights organisation aiming to support and strengthen the defence of human rights in South Asia with local NGOs and trade unions. The work focuses on labour rights of vulnerable groups in international supply chains. To achieve this, Arisa has adopted the following strategies: strengthening cooperation and networking; knowledge building through research and focussing on specific long-term thematic issues, and advocacy towards policy makers and companies. Arisa is an active member of networks such as the Stop Child Labour coalition, the Clean Clothes Campaign, the International Dalit Solidarity Network and the Dutch CSR Platform.[7]

 

2. Objective

 

To gain insight into the supply chain of garment and textile in Delhi/NCR, particularly in the intervention areas of the WNCB programme, between tier 1 (export garment factories) and tier 4/5 (homeworkers) and to identify direct linkages between export garment factories and homeworkers including child labourers that are working for the garment industry in Delhi/NCR.

 

This supply chain mapping will contribute to a better understanding on how the garment industry in Delhi/NCR is structured, specifically structures that exist between the export factories and the homeworkers, and provide recommendations on what measures can be taken by the garment sector to eliminate child labour in their supply chain.

 

Part of the study is to focus on specific cases, where the supply chain will be identified from several selected child labourers and their homeworking parents working for the garment industry in the WNCB intervention areas to the export garment factories, including all the subcontracting steps.

 

The supply chain mapping will feed into the larger research on the nature of child labour in the WNCB intervention areas. Furthermore, Arisa will use the supply chain information to identify international garment and textile companies that buy from the concerned export factories. Therefore, Arisa will do additional supply chain research on the international brands. All findings together will help shape engagement activities with the identified international companies and their suppliers, with the goal to eliminate child labour from their supply chains.

 

3. Research question and sub-questions

 

How is the supply chain of the garment and textile sector structured in Delhi/NCR, particularly in the intervention areas of the WNCB programme, between tier 1 (export garment factories) and tier 4/5 (homeworkers)?

 

Sub-questions for this study are:

  • How is the supply chain structured from export garment factories in Delhi/NCR to homeworkers including child labourers working in the production cicle of the respective export garment factories?

  • Who are the stakeholders facilitating the supply chains between export garment factories in Delhi/NCR and child labourers and homeworkers working for the concerned export factories, and what is their role?

  • What specific links can be identified between child labourers and their homeworking parents and exporting garment factories in Delhi/NCR?

  • Which steps in the supply chain can be identified between selected child labourers and their homeworking parents and exporting garment factories, and what stakeholders are involved?

  • To which exporting garment factories can the child labourers and their homeworking parents working for the garment industry in the WNCB intervention areas be linked?

Note: sub-question d) and e) refer to the specific case studies that are part of this study.

 

4. Output

 

A supply chain mapping report that shows:

  • The supply chain structures leading from export garment factories to child labourers and homeworkers working in the supply chain of the concerning export garment factory, including the details of each stakeholder/step involved.

  • A list of exporting factories that are linked to child labourers and homeworkers.

  • A calculation of the estimated prevalence of child labour in the supply chains of exporting garment companies in Delhi/NCR.

  • The specific case stories of the supply chain structures from the selected child labourers and their homeworking parents located in the WNCB intervention areas to the export garment factories, including the details of each stakeholder/step involved, and including the names of the identified export factories.

  • The methodology used for establishing the above-mentioned supply chain mappings.

5. Research methods

 

The supply chain research is based on:

 

  • Desk review

General information on the garment and textile sector in Delhi/NCR, information on the estimate of child labour prevalence in the supply chains of exporting factories in Delhi/NCR, information from business associations, supply chain data, etc.

  • Interviews with supply chain stakeholders

Interviews with relevant stakeholders, such as homeworkers, middlemen, working unit/factory owners, sub-contractors, and other relevant stakeholders that come forward during the study will give information on linkages between the different stakeholders in the supply chain from export garment factories to child labourers and homeworkers.

  • Consultations with the research organisation of the complementing sub-study

Regarding the case studies: Through the complementing sub-study that will look at the nature of child labour in the WNCB intervention areas, child labourers and homeworking parents will be identified. In collaboration with all research partners involved, a selection of child labourers and their homeworking parents will be made, from where specific mapping of steps in the supply chain towards export garment factories can be done. The individual supply chains will be mapped, starting with the child labourers and homeworking parents and following the different stakeholders involved, all the way to the exporting garment factories.

Regular consultations between the involved parties of the two sub-studies during the whole timeframe of the study is needed to keep the two sub-studies aligned.

  • Particpant observation

Observations may provide for information on where materials/orders that children and homeworkers process come from and brought to after processing, for all the different steps of the supply chain.

 

Please note that interviews with children are not part of this sub-study. Information on household level will be derived from interviews with homeworkers and the (homeworking) parents of the children involved.

 

For the case studies: Only adult homeworkers of which at least one child is working alongside the parent will be included.

 

Apart from the above-mentioned methods, other methods might be useful and can be included in the proposal to this ToR.

 

The study will be conducted in the area of Delhi/NCR, particularly in the intervention areas of the WNCB Programme: the districts of East and South-East Delhi.

 

6. Research ethics

 

All respondents taking part in the study must be informed about the study and its purpose and must give their consent to participate.

 

The research agency will also ensure that all the universally accepted principles of social research, viz. respect for the confidentiality of identity of respondents, respect for their right to refuse an interview, end the conversation at any stage or refuse to share a particular detail, respect for privacy and personal dignity of respondents, etc. are duly observed.

 

Regarding all data obtained through interviews, it is important to inform respondents that their identity will be kept confidential, to ensure they can speak freely and to avoid any adverse impact to respondents. It may be that this poses challenges when executing a supply chain mapping, as one stakeholder needs to provide information about another stakeholder, and a respondent preferably needs to be informed on where information on them was obtained. The research agency is expected to take this into consideration and provide for suggestions on how to overcome this challenge.

 

7. Qualification and requirements of researchers

  • Knowledge and experience in conducting supply chain research in complex supply chains; experience with research in the garment industry is recommended.

  • Knowledge and experience in conducting research that involves children and homeworkers.

  • Knowledge and experience in conducting research with a gender sensitive approach; as it can be assumed that most homeworking parents are women, while subcontractors and working units/factory owners most likely will be men.

  • Knowledge and experience in doing research in a community setting as well as within an industry setting.

8. Roles and responsibilities

 

In this process, the roles and responsibilities of Arisa will be as follows:

  • Sharing relevant documentation and information with researchers and supporting research activities where needed/possible;

  • Sharing contact details with the research agency responsible for the complementing sub-study;

  • Providing input and feedback on the activity plan, timeframe and budget;

  • Facilitating contact with project partners and other relevant contact persons;

  • Providing feedback on the report outline and draft version of the report.

In this process, the roles and responsibilities of the research agency will be as follow:

  • Develop a proposal for the sub-study based on the outline in this ToR;

  • Conduct the supply chain research as described in this ToR;

  • Communicate about progress and actions/decisions to be taken in consultation with Arisa;

  • Report any obstacles and delays to Arisa, and possible measures to overcome them as soon as possible;

  • Prepare an outline for the report and share and discuss this with Arisa;

  • Prepare a draft version of the research report and share this with Arisa and the other partners for the overall research: Save the Children India and ICCSPL;

  • Prepare a final version of the research report based on feedback from Arisa and the relevant WNCB partners.

9. Timeline and budget

 

Timeline: 5 months

 

Available budget: EUR 8,000

 

10. Application procedure and contact persons

 

The following set of documents is required to be enclosed as part of the application:

 

A brief proposal for the study (max. 3 pages)

 

The proposal will include the following:

  • The research organisations/ researchers’ interpretation of the ToR

  • Activity plan (incl. process steps and methodology used)

  • Budget specification in INR and EUR (incl. daily rate and taxes) and timeframe

  • Team structure / persons involved in the study

A document that holds information on:

  • Experience of similar assignments/supply chain mapping

  • Experience of doing child sensitive and gender sensitive research

CVs of the persons involved in the study

 

The application should be submitted to Arisa before 1 December, 2021 (contact person: Susanne Tempel, st@arisa.nl).

 

 


[1] Child labor in Delhi's home-based garment industry: Adolescence lost in struggle to survive. The New Indian Express. Dated: 24th September 2020. Accessed at https://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/delhi/2020/sep/24/child-labor-in-delhis-home-basedgarment-industry-adolescencelost-in-struggle-to-survive-2201216.html

[4] https://panjiva.com/. The number are based on shipment value. The shipment data analysis was done by Arisa as part of the Work: No Child’s Business programme. It is an internal document and can be provided for if needed.

[5] For more information on the WNCB programme: https://wncb.org/.

[6] Our definition of child labour is based on ILO Conventions 138 and 182.

[7] For more information about Arisa: https://arisa.nl/?lang=en


Job Email id: st@arisa.nl