The Nature Conservancy TNC
RFP to Develop a Communications Strategy and Implementation Plan For Project PRANA
Communications, IT, Media, Knowledge Management, Editor
India
Application Email : Rajeeb.Dash@tnc.org

Website

www.tnc.org

Job Type

Full Time

Closing Date

Jul 30 2021

Description

Request For Proposals To Develop A Communications Strategy and Implementation Plan For Project PRANA

 

Last date for submission of proposal: 30th July, 2021, 5:00 PM IST.

 

Key Dates:

 

Date of Issue: 14/07/2021

 

Closing Date: 30/07/2021

 

TNC – THE NATURE CONSERVANCY (TNC)

 

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP) TO

DEVELOP A COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FOR PROJECT PRANA 

 

I. INTRODUCTION

 

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) is the leading conservation organization working to make a positive impact around the world in more than 70 countries, with a new program in India. Founded in 1951, TNC’s mission is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. With our core values of integrity beyond reproach, respect for people communities and culture, and commitment to diversity we aim at environmental conservation through lasting tangible results. Visit www.nature.orgto learn more.

 

II. PURPOSE

 

It is the intention of TNC to solicit proposals for a four-year communications strategy and a first 18-month communications implementation work plan for the Project PRANA towards the achievement of the project goals expressed in the Theory of Change (TOC)[1].

 

THIS IS NOT AN ORDER.

 

III. BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT

The Indo-Gangetic plains of India are extremely fertile and provide food security for approximately 40% of India’s population[2]. The state of Punjab in the north-western region of India is among the highest producers of wheat and paddy in the country. Although Punjab comprise of 1.5% of the geographical area of the country, it contributes a major portion to the central paddy and wheat procurement pool to the Government of India. In 2019, Punjab was the highest contributor of both wheat and paddy[3]

 

During the Green Revolution in the 1960s, Punjab witnessed a shift to a paddy-wheat dominant cropping cycle, with a rise of highly intensive agricultural practices in terms of land, energy, capital, nutrients, water, agricultural inputs, and farm mechanization. While this allowed Punjab to become the food bowl of the country, it resulted in negative side effects such as the overextraction of groundwater, deterioration in soil-health, and the burning of crop residue which contributes to air quality concerns, among others.

 

The practice of burning paddy residue is prevalent across north-west India, particularly in

Punjab[4] as farmers have traditionally practiced this to clear the field for the next crop of wheat. While wheat straw can be used for cattle fodder, farmers across Punjab are unable to use nonbasmati paddy residue for fodder due to high silica content. This, in combination with the use of combine harvesters, which leave longer standing stubble than manual harvesting, leads to 12 million tonnes of paddy residue being burned every year by more than 2 million farmers in Punjab alone5 .

 

"For detailed information, please check the complete version of the RFP attached below."

[1] The TOC will be provided to bidders upon email request at rajeeb.dash@tnc.org

[2] Pal, D.K., Bhattacharya, T., Srivastava, P., Chandran, P., Ray, S.K. (2009). Soils of the Indo Gangetic Plains: Their historical perspective and management. Current Science 96, 1193-1202

[3] Department of Food & Public Distribution, Gol (2019), Available at https://dfpd.gov.in

[4] Lohan, S. K., Jat, H. S., Yadav, A. K. Sidhu, H. S., Jat, M. L., Choudhary, M., Peter, J. K., Sharma, P. C. (2018). Burning issues of paddy residue management in north-west states of India. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews. 81, 693–7065EPCA Report 2020 


Job Email id: Rajeeb.Dash@tnc.org Download Attachment: RFP_Communications Strategy 12.07.2021_Final.pdf